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Jeffrey G. Hunt

Directors

Jeffrey G. Hunt began his directing career in 2005 on the series CSI. His directing career now spans more than 50+ hours of Network television.

Questions

  1. How common, for a smaller Co-star role, that you’ll artistically change the direction of the character from the audition to the actual shoot?
  2. How often are you forced to cast a “friend or request” of one of your producers, and does that affect how you work with them, cover them… or eventually edit them…if they’re not particularly good?
  3. So its lunchtime, and you’re trying to get some food in you. Why do TV Directors typically not want to have too much of the Guest or Co-star cast sitting and talking to them during your lunch, or are you cool with it?
  4. Why do you love directing in the one-hour television format?
  5. Will you ever have the star throw a curveball at the Guest or Co-star and if so why and how often?
  6. Do actors ever attempt to market you or contact you via your representation, and if so, do you ever respond?
  7. Actors most of the time have to “pay their dues” in coming up to being a working actor or celebrity. How did you pay yours?
  8. You live way out in the middle of “somewhere LA.” So how does an actor ever manage to “get on your radar” if they’re not auditioning for an episode you’re directing?
  9. Honestly, when you’re given a script to shoot, how often to you submit a request list of actors to casting?
  10. If you’re in the room at the callbacks, would you more commonly re-direct an actor to get them closer to what you believe the character needs to be for the job…or more to see IF they can take direction?

About the Guru

Jeffrey G. Hunt began his directing career in 2005 on the series CSI. He has since directed multiple episodes of CSI, as well asDark Blue, Chase, The Whole Truth, Burn Notice, CSI NY, Close to Home, Justice, and most recently directed the seriesTerminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles. His directing career now spans more than 50+ hours of Network television. He now has more than 18 years of on-set experience in the motion picture industry. His humble beginnings started at the ripe age of 18, as a lighting technician on feature films and television. At 20 he attended Art Center College of Design’s film program. Shortly after his Art Center experience Jeffrey began working as a camera operator and cinematographer in commercials and music videos. Over the course of several years he earned the respect of his peers. Prior to becoming a working director, Jeffrey served as an A-camera / Steadicam operator on numerous theatrically released films and over 150 hours of network television.